Wearable electronics workshop on 2nd Nov

 

Meg Grant
“Electronics for Designers”
– Getting started with code-free wearable circuits
Time: wednesday 2.11. 14-17
Place: Sewing workshop in Lume Center, Aalto University School of Art and Design
This mini-workshop is a short introduction to wearable electronics. We will experiment with simple electronic circuits that can be integrated into textiles, garments or installations. A variety of sensors that detect light, heat, pressure or bending can be used to make these circuits interactive and they can produce output in the form of light and sound. In this short workshop we will be working with simple components that can be assembled to working interactive circuits without programming.
Don’t worry if you forgot everything you learnt about electronics in high school.  The main aim of this workshop is to get you comfortable working with basic circuits.  We’ll start simple and encourage experimentation.  We’ll use mostly traditional components, but we’ll also look at how to re-think these components so that they can be integrated with non-traditional materials.  So if you’d like to make friends with electronics, but don’t know where to start, this workshop is for you.
Meg Grant (NZ/NL) is a designer, programmer and artist exploring how wearable electronics can influence our relationships with people around us.  Formally trained in Fashion Design and a self-taught programmer, equal passions for interactive media and electronics guided her naturally into wearable technology as an art form. She is active in the Arduino and online open source hardware communities. As a member of the v2_ eTextile Workspace in Rotterdam, she helped organise part of the Maker Lab at the DMY Festival Berlin 2010.  Her first major piece, “Apology Helmet”, was featured in Wired Online as an example of new thinking that blurs the borders between product design and art.
http://www.meggrant.com
No electronics or programming experience required! All materials needed for the workshop are provided by the organisers. The maximum number of participants is about 20. Sign up by sending email to markku.nousiainen@aalto.fiUPDATE

UPDATE: We already have 20 participants, no seats left in the workshop! Thanks to all those who have signed up.


Electronics for Designers
– Getting started with code-free wearable circuits

Workshop by Meg Grant

Time: wednesday 2.11. 14-17
Place: Sewing workshop in Lume Center, Aalto University School of Art and Design

This mini-workshop is a short introduction to wearable electronics. We will experiment with simple electronic circuits that can be integrated into textiles, garments and installations. A variety of sensors that detect light, heat, pressure or bending can be used to make these circuits interactive and they can produce output in the form of light and sound.

We will be working with simple components that can be assembled to working interactive circuits without programming. Don’t worry if you forgot everything you learnt about electronics in high school.  The main aim of this workshop is to get you comfortable working with basic circuits.  We’ll start simple and encourage experimentation.  We’ll use mostly traditional components, but we’ll also look at how to re-think these components so that they can be integrated with non-traditional materials.  So if you’d like to make friends with electronics, but don’t know where to start, this workshop is for you.

No electronics or programming experience is needed. All materials are provided for the workshop by the organisers. The maximum number of participants is about 20.

Sign up by sending email to markku (dot) nousiainen (at) aalto (dot) fi.

About the teacher:

Meg Grant (NZ/NL) is a designer, programmer and artist exploring how wearable electronics can influence our relationships with people around us.  Formally trained in Fashion Design and a self-taught programmer, equal passions for interactive media and electronics guided her naturally into wearable technology as an art form. She is active in the Arduino and online open source hardware communities. As a member of the v2_ eTextile Workspace in Rotterdam, she helped organise part of the Maker Lab at the DMY Festival Berlin 2010.  Her first major piece, “Apology Helmet”, was featured in Wired Online as an example of new thinking that blurs the borders between product design and art.

http://www.meggrant.com


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